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◼️ Innovation Micro-interview #5 - Jay LATTA, Munich

A series of micro-interviews with people we work with. Partners in crime, current or former customers, all have a unique view on innovation and the current zeitgeist. Five questions on innovation, short answers. We might agree, we might disagree. No context, no comments.
◼️ Innovation Micro-interview #5 - Jay LATTA, Munich
Jay Latta
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Jay LATTA, Munich / Technology Journalist, CEO at STINT, and strategist currently developing open networks - like PANAFRIN or EERIC - and building partnerships to support emerging technology markets.

1. How do you define innovation, and why is it important for you (personally, not for your professional activity)?

Innovation is the way. Never a product or a company. This seems to be a huge misunderstanding. For me, innovation is the making part of creativity. What comes after ideation. To imagine and then make new things happen is in my DNA.

2. If we only consider “digital” what’s the biggest impact you witnessed directly these last years (remote working notwithstanding)?

Human augmentation in a human-centric way. Not us adapting on the machine. Helping humans to automatize tasks and workflows, research and reports. Getting rid of BS work and claiming quality time instead.

3. What’s currently the hottest topic in your field that you believe might have a chance to really be transformative?

I am currently with a really hot startup in Brain-Computer Interfaces. Use cases from healthcare, robotics, XR… it’s endless.

4. In contrast, what's the most over-hyped topic and why?

NFT. The people do not understand that they don’t own the asset. NFT is just a “symlink” in a blockchain pointing on this third party server.

5. What is the most surprising weak signal you have direct knowledge of that we all should be paying more attention to?

The drive from the next generations. We still think that WE have the power, but they are the workers and customers of the future. They have different experiences, expectations, and requirements. Well-being, ethics, collaboration, and cooperation are the key to the future. Competition is over, a relict of our generations.