To go or not to go to Women in Tech conferences?

I attended last week the European Women in Tech conference in Amsterdam. It was the second year in a row, and in the end I am reminded of one of Philippe’s article about why we do not attend conferences anymore, or so very rarely. The conference was at best « uneven » as a friend said who attended with me. Over the two days I enjoyed some talks and thought only a couple were interesting – really bringing some useful and practical insights for women in tech.

Here are the good the bad and the ugly about this conference:

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Well, it’s been 10 years

It’s been ten 10 years that I quit my last position as an employee from another company than my own. I started for a first year and half as a freelance consultant on strategy and then we founded Merkapt, our first consulting company with Stéphanie. 2007 Was the year the first iPhone went to market and that Amazon Web Service started to ramp up. Quite a year if you ask me…

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A quick feedback from Autonomy 2017 in Paris

Most of the things we are seeing or talking about during keynotes are quite nice and somehow crafty. How to unlock car sharing or green mobility in this town, or that other one? Are we are going to manage mobility data? After all the buzz with MaaS, how are we going to do it? Will Hyperloop bring peace and end hunger worldwide? Etc. All that is cute, and sometimes even a bit exhilarating.

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5 takeaways for innovators from NEXT17

So I spent 2 days in Hamburg with a big bunch of nerds (self-declared) who are involved with digital and the business of the future at the Next17 Conference entitled “Digital Sucks!”. You may not have been able to join this year, or you are French and didn’t know about it (apparently I was the only French person in the room) so I would like to share with you my 5 take-aways:
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How the iPad Pro became our main work computer

Three months ago I started to switch from my Mac desktop and laptop to an iPad. I was working in Shanghai giving classes and conferences thinking on how to have the most minimalist setup for this kind of interactions. When you focus on mobility and travel it’s difficult to beat a 9.7-inch iPad. And since the new ‘Pro’ version was readily available, there was the promise of removing past problems I encountered trying an iPad for work.

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My next keynote on the second coming of Cloud

Stéphanie and I are regularly delivering strategic keynotes for executive boards in various markets. They all address key issues at stake for specific industrial customers. They are also all wrapped under some form of NDA or another. While it’s always frustrating not to be able to share things, we try from time to time to afford some level of teasing…

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So what’s next in business agility?

So yes, we are going to the NEXT conference in Hamburg this year, whose theme is: Digital sucks! After years of excitement with everything digital, the time of disenchantment is upon us and the Next conference will ask / answer the question of what’s next? This triggered my thinking about what is next in business agility, now that all the corporate excitement about working with startups and being intrapreneurs is deflating like a souflé.

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What constitues a good startup problem

Most of the startups participating in one of my trainings are initially shocked at the inordinate amount of time I spend working on ‘the problem’. I’m certainly not alone there. Everyone who is regularly dealing with startups gets eventually frustrated to see how they concentrate en masse on building a product and not focusing on what the market actually needs. And while anyone who ambitions to shake a market’s status quo shouldn’t be too pragmatic, as much rationality as possible should nevertheless prevail. But, very few are the startups committed from launch to tackle a clear-cut problem.

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