35 Ways self-driving vehicles are happening before 2020

A majority of automotive industry incumbents still bet on the (very) slow maturation of self-driving vehicles. Of course they can only think about personal cars…

The key argument of doubters on how fast the self-driving vehicles will go live is risk and the social acceptability (or the lack thereof) of deaths from vehicles making choices on their own. Truth to be told, yes, social acceptability is a steep barrier to entry for adopting technologies at large scale. You should nonetheless remember that innovation is not a clean decisive strike either, its death of the status quo by a thousand cuts.

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Emotions powered innovation

Leveraging emotions to get more powered innovation is like being able to harness an underestimated and sustainable source of energy. What is stopping you?

When we talk about innovation we say it is motion. Until there is movement or change in the market, you cannot call your invention or idea an innovation. Emotions at work can either support or hinder innovation. They can be strong drivers for action, change and movement, and keep people alert and aware of signals in their environment or become uncontrollable, completely unproductive or even freeze creativity. Finding the “right” level of emotions or as I call it “emotional sweet spot” is key to powered innovation.

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Dealing with failure in innovation and the Monty Hall problem

Failure when you innovate is totally acceptable. At least in books and on the internet. In real life, within your business this is a widely different story. Risk is only acceptable when you end up successful… Very successful. This usually demonstrates how poorly we manage risk…

Innovation literature is flooded with various arguments on why and how you should take risk as a company. As someone who’s depending on the success of the companies I work with (sometimes I even presume much more than their own management), I can’t avoid being one of these risk evangelist. The problem essentially is always the same. Risk is waved on principles as a good thing supported by plethoras of well-thinking weak sauce arguments. Inevitably, all these arguments are swiftly shelved when real work needs to be done.

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Understanding the new network effects

Innovative companies have been relying more and more on network effects to aggressively spread transformative market changes. This strategy has many forms and is still dramatically evolving. Do you understand its most recent developments?

Understanding network effects has been the underlying driver of the software revolution sparked less than a decade ago. And as always with innovation, as soon as we think we start to grasp it, it already morphes into something new. In our case, new network effects appear and we barely start to grasp them.

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Three scenarios of corporate culture change

From birth to old age, the company culture is not embedded in the same way. Hence it is essential to take a differentiated approach to corporate culture change.

The main reason why a corporate culture change fails is the lack of awareness of what the specific culture of the company is. Although it can be observed via the behaviours of employees, leaders are often blind to it until something unexpected and critical for the organisation happens. As it was the case for Uber and United Airlines. But waiting for such a wake-up call might be lethal as the company may not be able to readjust the culture in time and recover from the public blow.

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A full stack approach to corporate culture change

Avoiding the usual pitfalls of culture change means focusing on coherence and meaning.

Even when most of the “right” ingredients were implemented, most corporate culture changes fail anyway. And the quintessential trap is always the same: the culture of a company is a multi-layered assemblage. Work on one layer at a time (such as the behaviours) and you’ll have results. However, after a while, other layers that were unchanged (values, vision…) will collide and counteract the initial results. These various elements of corporate culture move at different speeds. They don’t even have the same plasticity and are driven by factors that can be very counter-intuitive. In the end, avoiding a full-stack approach to corporate culture change is a rookie mistake. Let’s see then how to deal with it…

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4 Keys to boost your reverse mentoring programme

Ask junior employees to mentor senior managers on the digital transformation. Such an obvious and bright idea. What can go wrong?

After a few years designing and supporting reverse mentoring programmes, many of the same issues keep coming back. Reverse mentoring is often a great strategy to support the digital transformation of an organisation since it connects senior decision makers with junior digital natives. The idea is simple, by encouraging cross-generational discussions and experience sharing the organisation gains in agility in the digital era. However, in reality, many issues cloud this simple logic and we are going to explore why that happens and how to get over it.

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Why culture change fails

Companies are making many different attempts to change their cultures as they realise that it has become critical if they want to survive in their rapidly evolving markets.

When dealing with corporate culture change, companies usually choose among three main strategies. Every one of them has obvious benefits but often is badly implemented because the overall logic of culture change is not understood. One of the usual trap is that culture change is often too directive, and directing hundreds or thousands of people to behave differently, to think differently, to make different decisions, to have risk mindset… becomes an impossible task. Here we’ll explore the three usual ways to change organisational culture follow, see their benefits, and why they fail. This will lead us in a follow up article to open a different approach more rooted in how the organisation’s DNA and its culture intertwine.

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Trading risks keynote

If you’re in Darmstadt on May 17th, you can join me and the wonderful team of the Merck Innovation Center at 5:30pm for a keynote on Trading Risks. We’ll discuss how startups and multinationals should recalibrate their relationships after years of fumbling around, and why building no-bullshit synergies matters more than ever.

Follow this link for further details.

Let’s grab a sake in Tokyo

I’ll be in Tokyo from May 22 to 26. As usual, I’ll be working with customers, but if you’re around this is also a good time to grab a coffee or a bite and exchange on business, innovation or other things. Just connect with me on Twitter or through the ‘Contact us’ menu above. I might also have spare time for a keynote or an event in case you’d be interested.

How to explain your business

We tend to use overly complex or simplistic tools to design or assess businesses. The middle-road of simple to understand, yet weaponized tools is always hard to get to. Ask any any executive or entrepreneur to explain his company and you usually get a mess.

Two weeks in Shanghai working with dozens of MBA students holding managerial and executive positions in various industries always ground me back to the basics of business. One of the most basic questioning that managers, innovators, or would-be entrepreneurs are asked is: can you explain your business? The answer is always a mess.

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The book on ‘La Fabrique des Mobilités’ is out

La Fabrique des Mobilités is a European acceleration program dedicated to transportation and mobility projects.

A large part of my work in 2016 was helping the French Environment and Energy Management Agency to develop a better, more effective action on the tremendously complex mobility market. There is now a digital book that explains how this collective endeavor has been achieved and where the ‘FabMob’ collective is in 2017.

Hopefully, there will be an English version at some points (especially given the fact that there are more and more international partners on this platform), but for now, it’s 80% in French.

 

Emotions augmented leaders

For many years Emotional Intelligence has been in the many leadership development agendas of HR and training program managers. In this series about emotions, I’ll endeavor to offer leaders a new way to understand emotions so they can develop their emotional and self-awareness as well as their capacity for empathy.

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Being market ready is not all about strategy

Market readiness is key when launching new businesses. Too soon and you burn money without onboarding customers, too late and you become an overnight commodity.

When I deal with leaders considering new strategic options for the future of their organization, they very often stay cautious and declare “the market is not ready”.

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