12 Things we learned in 10 years of consulting

After launching our consulting business in 2007, we finally moved to Amsterdam and made a soft reboot of our activity to better adjust to our lifestyle. After 10 years of consulting, these are 12 things we learned and we still focus on.

My good friend Stéphane (and sometimes partner in crime) has made a remarkable two-part blog about his “post-mortem” of four years of consulting. This is only in French though, but hurry up and Google-translate it. I don’t think we would change a word to it. Of course, if ‘post-mortem’ is probably not the right term when you have had such success at launching a new consultancy as he had, the idea was challenging enough that we decided to follow-up. Continue reading “12 Things we learned in 10 years of consulting”

What type of entrepreneur are you?

In my just over fifteen years of working with entrepreneurs, I have met many profiles and for each individual comes different needs for support. A couple of years ago, I put together this typology, based on behaviours rather than personality for an acceleration program…

It is key to understand what type of entrepreneur an incubator is supporting in order to cater to their specific needs. Do they need to develop their awareness of opportunities or their capacity to engage with the right ecosystem? The profiles are based on 3 key families of behaviours which have been proved to be critical for entrepreneurs to succeed: Continue reading “What type of entrepreneur are you?”

The market point of view

A very effective acid test if you’re an innovator: Do you change the point of view of the market? A very effective pitch synopsis: Why and how do you change the point of view of the market? A very effective monetization strategy: How much is the change in point of view worth to the market? A very effective recruiting strategy: Do you want to change the market point of view with us? I think you get it.

Why I mostly don’t go to innovation conferences anymore

I am very often questioned on why –my work being helping deliver innovation to markets– I don’t care for most innovation conferences.

I don’t either care so much for technology roadshows, prospective think tanks, and other events where the future is explained to the rest of us, while we frantically retweet catchy slogans of software eating the world. And for sure, I feel bad for European startups and tech giants feeling they have to attend the CES Las Vegas as the eye of the storm of it all. This is why, explained in the most perfect way:

Continue reading “Why I mostly don’t go to innovation conferences anymore”