Can iPhones have a soul?

I’ve had a long-lasting reflection on luxury and technology. This very slippery subject is somehow fascinating because we instinctively understand why an Android tablet is anything but luxury; it’s not so easy to pin point why Apple couldn’t get there.

There is no denying that the younger the demographic is, the newest the technology should be. And whatever your age, when you love technology there is no way to escape the endorphin rush coming from unpacking a new gadget. And that’s fine. But getting older we progressively shift our values away from short-term.

Continue reading “Can iPhones have a soul?”

The role of power laws to build the future of innovation

We don’t see the future, but we seek patterns. When patterns don’t appear naturally, we invent them so that reality could fit our narrative about innovation.

Such narrative will work for a few years; even decades sometimes. But it doesn’t change the underlying complexity of the market. The narrative is not wrong per se, it’s a useful bias to explain a chaotic reality. These last decades, the most well-known narratives about innovation were based on the speed at which technology was changing the market. Interestingly enough, connecting technology and market change is also a narrative.

Continue reading “The role of power laws to build the future of innovation”

My innovation radar for 2017

This is a quick take at describing what’s on my innovation radar for 2017.

As someone with the finger on the pulse of many technology fields in many markets, I tend to have a lateral view on trendy topics. I’m also a contrarian, so take that into account. But if I’d have to share what I have on my innovation radar for 2017, this would be something like that:  Continue reading “My innovation radar for 2017”